|
Twitter
|
Facebook
|
Google+
|
VKontakte
|
LinkedIn
|
 
 
International Journal of Innovation and Scientific Research
ISSN: 2351-8014
 
 
Thursday 15 November 2018

About IJISR

News

Submission

Downloads

Archives

Custom Search

Contact

Connect with IJISR

   
 
 
 

Ethno-botanical and floristic study of some edible caterpillars host plants of medicinal relevance in the Bakumu-Mangongo sector (Ubundu Territory, Tshopo Province, DR Congo)


[ Etude ethnobotanique et floristique de quelques plantes hôtes des chenilles comestibles à usage médicinal dans le secteur de Bakumu-Mangongo (Territoire d’Ubundu, Province de la Tshopo, RD Congo) ]

Volume 26, Issue 1, August 2016, Pages 146–160

 Ethno-botanical and floristic study of some edible caterpillars host plants of medicinal relevance in the Bakumu-Mangongo sector (Ubundu Territory, Tshopo Province, DR Congo)

E. Okangola, E. Solomo, Y. Lituka, W.B. Tchatchambe, M. Mate, A. Upoki, A. Dudu, Justin A. Asimonyio, Pius T. Mpiana, and Koto-te-Nyiwa Ngbolua

Original language: French

Received 17 June 2016

Copyright © 2016 ISSR Journals. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract


The study of the plants hosts of the edible caterpillars of medicinal use used in the treatment of the diseases in the sector of Bakumu-Mangongo led to the inventory list of 18 species belonging to 12 different families to Fabaceae prevalence. These plants generally come from the forests secondary (12 species) and dominated especially by the trees (17 species), the phanerophytes in particular the mesophanerophytes (11espèces), the sarcochores (14 species) and with distribution Guineo-congolese (16 species) among which 9 species are Omni-guineo-congolese. The drugs are often prepared by decoction or aqueous maceration at basis of the fresh leaves, the roots, the barks of stem or trunk, the bark of root, latexes and are managed by oral route, anal way and bath of the body. Accessibility to the edible caterpillars and the plant species of medicinal value are the positive assets of these resources for the populations. On the other hand, the no-ecological exploitation of these resources could lead to deforestation, disappearance if not rarefaction of the biocenoses and the disturbance of the ecosystems.

Author Keywords: Congo basin, Forest, Caterpillars host plants, Traditional remedies, No-timber forest products.


Abstract: (french)


L’étude des plantes hôtes des chenilles comestibles à usage médicinal utilisées dans le traitement des maladies dans le secteur de Bakumu-Mangongo a conduit à l’inventaire de 18 espèces appartenant à 12 familles différentes à prédominance Fabaceae. Ces plantes proviennent généralement des forêts secondaires (12 espèces) et dominées surtout par les arbres (17 espèces), les phanérophytes notamment les mésophanérophytes (11espèces), les sarcochores (14 espèces) et à distribution Guinéo-congolaises (16 espèces) parmi lesquelles 9 espèces sont Omni-guinéo-congolaises. Les médicaments sont souvent préparés par décoction ou macération aqueuse à base des feuilles fraiches, des racines, des écorces de tige ou tronc, de l’écorce de racine, de latex et administrés par voie orale, voie anale et bain du corps. L’accessibilité aux chenilles comestibles et aux plantes à usage médicinal sont les atouts positifs de ces essences pour les populations. Par contre, l’exploitation non écologique de ces essences entrainerait la déforestation, la disparition si pas raréfaction des biocénoses et la perturbation des écosystèmes.

Author Keywords: Bassin du Congo, Forêt, Plantes à chenilles, remèdes traditionnelles, Produits forestiers non ligneux.


How to Cite this Article


E. Okangola, E. Solomo, Y. Lituka, W.B. Tchatchambe, M. Mate, A. Upoki, A. Dudu, Justin A. Asimonyio, Pius T. Mpiana, and Koto-te-Nyiwa Ngbolua, “Ethno-botanical and floristic study of some edible caterpillars host plants of medicinal relevance in the Bakumu-Mangongo sector (Ubundu Territory, Tshopo Province, DR Congo),” International Journal of Innovation and Scientific Research, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 146–160, August 2016.